Wednesday, December 15, 2021

11th Social Justice Film Festival of India 2022

11th Social Justice Film Festival of India 2022

11th Social Justice Film Festival of India 2022 will be organised by MARUPAKKAM in association with various cultural organisations and educational institutions on 14-18 April 2022 at multiple venues in Chennai depending upon the local restrictions due to Covid.

Entries are invited ! A non competitive film festival! 

A moderate screening fee will be paid to all the selected films!

Categories : Documentaries, short fiction, experimental films, music videos and animation films

Mahatma Phule

Rules and Regulations :

1) Films based on Social Justice will be accepted
2) Indian and international & Old and new films are invited
3) One filmmaker / producer can send any number of films
4) Films that promote hatred will not be accepted
5) Both Indian and international films are invited
6) Films without entry fee will not be accepted
7) It is a non competitive film festival
8) Entry fee will not be returned if the entries are withdrawn or if the films are not selected
9) Selection committees' decisions are final
10) One member from the selected films will be invited to the physical event
11) No travel will be provided; a simple stay for 3 days will be provided
12) Only the films with subtitles in English will be accepted
13) Festival will be organised physically depending upon the local rules by administration. If the physical event is not possible, films will be shown online
14) Interactions with the filmmakers will be organised online if required and possible
15) A moderate screening fee will be paid to all the selected films

Last date to send entries : 1 February 2022

Click here to send the entries



Social Justice Film Festivals since 2014

 Social Justice Film Festivals in India since 2014

We have organised 10 film festivals so far across India on Social Justice in association with various organisations.

The chronology of the film festivals as follows :

1st Social Justice Film Festival 2014, Chennai 

2nd Social Justice Film Festival 2017, Chennai 

3rd Social Justice Film Festival 2017, Bangalore 

4th Social Justice Film Festival 2017, New Delhi 

5th Social Justice Film Festival 2018, Hyderabad 

6th Social Justice Film Festival 2018, Patna 

7th Social Justice Film Festival 2018, Bangalore

8th Social Justice Film Festival 2018, Chennai 

9th Social Justice Film Festival 2019, Chennai 

10th Social Justice Film Festival 2021, Chennai 

The list continues...

Monday, October 8, 2018

Social Justice Film Festival # 8, Chennai : Screening Schedule

Social Justice Film Festival #08, Chennai

Curated by Amudhan R.P.
Jointly organised by MARUPAKKAM and Goethe - Institut, Chennai
27-29 Oct; 10 am to 8 pm; Goethe - Institut / Max Mueller Bhavan, Chennai


 

Screening Schedule

27 Oct; Saturday

10 am Inauguration
Chief Guest : Trotsky Maruthu (painter / artist)
"Social Justice and Media" - Special lecture on Social Justice : Senthalir (journalist)

11:00 Some Stories around Witches (Dir: Lipika Singh Darai; 44 min; India)


 

The film explores the politics of witch hunting - how superstition, greed, ignorance, fear, insecurity and power work together to cause immense violence and suffering.

11:45 Interaction with Karuna Miryam (activist/researcher)
12:00 Green (Dir: Patrick Rouxel; 47 min; France / Indonesia)



Set in Indonesia. Meet Green, an orangutan and victim of human impact. Follow the devastating journey as her home is destroyed by logging, clearing for palm oil plantations, and the choking haze of rainforest fires. Hauntingly poetic and without narration, the film creatively depicts the effects of consumerism on tropical rainforests as we are faced with our personal accountability in the loss of the world's treasures.

12:50 Interaction with Sajith Attepuram (activist)

1:00 Lunch break

2:00 The Battle of Bhima Koregaon (Dir: Somnath Waghmare; 49 min; India)



This documentary is about the 500 Mahar soldiers (the untouchables) who offered to fight alongside their countrymen, against the colonisers. Rejected by the ruling class they joined forces with the colonisers and fought in the 'Bhima Koregaon Battle', defeating the Brahminical rule of the Peshwas. Just as history did, so do the media and ruling class today conveniently forget to acknowledge them. On​ the 1st of​ January, every year, 20 lakh (2 million) people gather at Bhima-Koregaon, Pune, Maharashtra to commemorate that battle.

2:50 Interaction with Prof Arunkannan (Loyola College)

3:10 A Delicate Weave (Dir: Anjali Monteiro & KP Jayasankar; 62 min; India)



A Delicate Weave, set in Kachchh, Gujarat, India, traces four different musical journeys, all converging in the ways they affirm religious diversity, syncretism and love of the other.

4:15 Interaction

4:35 Radiation Stories (Dir: Amudhan R.P.; 80 min; India)



The people’s movement against Koodankulam nuclear plant is a 20 plus years old story. Post Fukushima saw the movement gaining momentum in and around Koodankulam and Idinthakarai villages thanks to the test run conducted by nuclear authorities of Koodankulam which brought in the inland farmers, workers, small traders and lower middle salaried class to the struggle along with the fishing community.

5:55 Interaction

6:15 The Question of Social Justice and Intersectionality - Special lecture on Social Justice : Dr. Binitha Thampi (IIT- Madras)

Day 2; 28 October

10 am The Long Distance (Dir: Daniel Andreas Sager; 91 min; Germany / Kenya)



A farmer woman from Kenya and a shepherd boy want to run their way out of poverty. Their hope is to be able to join highly paid marathons in Europe with the help of a German athletics manager.

11:30 Interaction

11:45 Ladies and Gentlewomen (Dir: Malini Jeevarathnam; 46 min; India)




A film about love, life, and suicides among lesbians.

12:30 Interaction with Malini Jeevaratnam (filmmaker), Srijith Sundaram (theatre director / actor / activist)

1:00 Lunch break

2:00 The Children Send Their Regards (Dir: Patricia Marchart; 104 min; Germany)



They were acolytes, pupils, wards and foster home children, who were sexually, emotionally and physically abused by members of the clergy. Accompanied by the camera, the victims visit the locations of the crimes from back then. Many are making their stories public for the first time.

3:45 Interaction with Tamilzh Prabakaran (filmmaker / journalist)

4:00 Valentina (Dir: Maximilian Feldmann; 51 min; Germany)



A slum in a Romani neighbourhood. Ten year old Valentina invites us to meet her family. What follows are bizarre anecdotes, day dreams and documentary observations - a film as lively as it roaming heroine.

5:00 Interaction 

5:15 Perunkadal Vettathu (Dir Arul Ezhilan; 60 min; India)



Fishermen who inhabit the southern most peripheries of India, were caught in cyclone Ockhi and were given up to die in sea without being rescued by the government. This documentary discusses those painful events, the tragic condition that followed of their families and the political reasons behind these deaths. This documentary also looks deeper into the havoc caused by cyclone Ockhi, the unspeakable tragedy that befallen on the fishermen community of Kanyakumari and the political reasons that prevented them from getting help. 

6:15 Interaction with Arul Ezhilan (filmmaker/journalist), Dhayalan (media person)

6:45 Three Stories from the Law : of life, liberty and dignity - Special lecture on Social Justice : Adv Usha Ramanathan

Day 3, 29 October

10 am Where the Grass Grows Highest (Dir: Philip Hallay & Christian Spieß; 51 min; Germany / Mangolia)




Begzuren lives in the ger district of Ulan Bator, Mongolia. Due to a lack of space, survival is very difficult. Still tourists from all over the world come into his modest ger to exchange life experiences. Dalai’s lives in Bayangol Sum, a two hours drive from Ulan Bator. Instead of living in a chaotic metropolis, he enjoys the vastness of the veldt. His son, destined to inherit his father’s nomadic tradition, is secretly dreaming of Ulan Bator.

10:50 Interaction with Dr. Anandhi (MIDS), Dhamayanthi (writer / filmmaker)

11:00 am Dispossessed (Dir: Mathieu Roy; 83 min; Canada)



The Dispossessed is an impressionist journey that sheds light on the daily strife of the world’s hungry farming class. In this era of industrialized agriculture, across the globe, people who produce food are paid less than almost any other profession. Part cinema-vérité, part essay, our film examines the mechanisms by which farmers are falling into a somber cycle of despair, debt and dispossession.

12:25 Interaction with Muthukrishnan (writer / activist), Dr.Anandhi (MIDS), Dhamayanthi (writer/filmmaker)

1:00 Lunch break

2:00 pm Words on Water (Dir: Sanjay Kak; 85 min; India)



For more than 15 years, people of the Narmada Valley in central India have resisted a series of massive dams on their river, and in their struggle have exposed the deceptive heart of India s development politics. When the use of violence has become the arbiter of all political debate, 'Words on Water' is about a sustained non-violent resistance, an almost joyous defiance, which empowers people as they struggle for their rights, yet saves them from the ultimate humiliation of violence.

3:25 Interaction with Muthukrishnan (writer / activist), R R Srinivasan (filmmaker / activist)

3:40 Lock and Key (Dir: Shilpi Gulati; 82 min; India)



Taala Te Kunjee, is a heart wrenching story of Five recovering addicts at The Hermitage Rehab, Amritsar, Punjab. This story beautifully captures the essence of recovery from addiction and how these recovered addicts along with their families are helping other sufferers recover from the rampant drug problem in the state. While they struggle to establish new relationships with their pasts, their wives strive to redefine the meaning of love. An intimate portrayal of recovery, 'Taala Te Kunjee' is about relationships and the labor of everyday.

5:00 Interaction

5:15 Hora (Dir: Nachi; 24 min; India)



HORA literally meaning a fortune teller in marati language. It’s a folk theater form used to tell fortunes. Vilas ghogre a reveloutionary poet metamorphosed the form to predict the political future of the world. Adapting that form in film’s narrative technique too we follow the life of Rupali jadhav who is an activist singer in Kabir Kala Manch a cultural-political troupe using songs as a means of protest and revolt.

5:40 Interaction with Nachi, filmmaker

6:00 Closing Ceremony 

Special Lecture on Social Justice : Imayam, writer

Felicitation by Prince Ennares Periyar, filmmaker/activist


Friday, September 14, 2018

Social Justice Film Festival 2018, Chennai : International Films

Social Justice Film Festival 2018

Jointly organised by MARUPAKKAM and Goethe Institut Chennai

International Films

Valentina (Dir:Maximilian Feldmanna; 51 min; Germany; Documentary)
A slum in a Romani neighbourhood. Ten-year-old Valentina invites us to meet her family. What follows are bizarre anecdotes, daydreams and documentary observations – a film as lively as its roaming heroine.

Where the Grass Grows the Highest (Dir: Phillip Hallay; 51 min; Manoglia; Documentary)
Begzuren lives in the ger district of Ulan Bator, Mongolia. Due to a lack of space, survival is very difficult. Still tourists from all over the world come into his modest ger to exchange life experiences. Dalai’s lives in Bayangol Sum, a two hours drive from Ulan Bator. Instead of living in a chaotic metropolis, he enjoys the vastness of the veldt. His son, destined to inherit his father’s nomadic tradition, is secretly dreaming of Ulan Bator.

Mostly Waiting (Dir: Thandi Sebe & Tim Foresta; 30 min; South Africa; Documentary)
Cape Town. Three men from Zimbabwe who came to South Africa in search of work and a better life, now spend their days on the side of a street, hoping for a job. An intimate look at what it is like to be a homeless refugee living on the streets of an afrophobic country and the dreams that the men have for their futures.

Long Distance (Dir: Daniel Andreas Sager; 93 min; Somalia; Documentary)
A farmer woman from Kenya and a shepherd boy want to run their way out of poverty. Their hope is to be able to join highly paid marathons in Europe with the help of a German athletics manager. A journey into presumed luck unexpectedly leads to the limits of human capacity. How much can hope make you endure pain in the fight against your own body? A thickly woven network of dependencies emerges, in which there is no decision free of consequences for another.

The Children Send their Regards
(Dir: Patricia Josefine Marchart; 104 min; Germany; Documentary)
Their names are George, Inge, Jo, Sepp, Paula, Walo, Anita, Klaus and Klaus. They were acolytes, pupils, wards and foster home children, who were sexually, emotionally and physically abused by members of the clergy. Accompanied by the camera, the victims visit the locations of the crimes from back then. Many are making their stories public for the first time.

Their families are also only finding out about this hidden pain for the first time. A nightmarish insight into arguably the greatest crime of the post-war period. Yet abuse remains a trauma throughout society, made possible by an environment of repression and of piety. Today, the Church and the state are allies in this cover-up. An accusation that will make you speechless, but also gives hope: “I have said everything, I am no longer a victim“, says Jo, one of the protagonists of the film.

Das Haus Neben Den Gleisen (Dir Nora Fingscheidt, Simone Catharina Gual; 66 min; Germany; Documentary)
The women's shelter in Stuttgart: 50 rooms, 50 residents, 50 destinies - and in the background the rattle of the trains. Sylvia wants to get out of the shelter and back to her own apartment. Carola loves the place like her home, especially her view from the window. Gabi has come to terms with the situation and has started to make art. All women have one thing in common: at one point in their lives they were without a roof over their heads and ended up in a shelter. Encounters with special women in a special place.

Sunday, February 4, 2018

Social Justice Film Festival #5 - Hyderabad

Social Justice Film Festival #5

Curated by Amudhan R. P.

Organised by Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Law and Civil Society, NALSAR University of Law, Hyderabad





Screening Schedule

Day 01: 10 Feb, Saturday

10.00 to 10.15am: Inauguration

10-15am to 12.05pm: Film: Kakkoos (108min); Director: Divya Bharathi
The documentary, shot in 25 districts for over a year, conveys the message that even though manual scavenging was banned in India in 2013 it continues to exist and conservancy workers are involved in removing human waste. The film is dedicated to those who maintain a “false silence on manual scavenging”. 

12-05 to 12.15pm: Tea Break

12.15to 1.00pm: Discussion: With Dr. Partha Sarathy, EFL-U, Hyderabad

1.00 to 2.00pm: Lunch Break

2.00 to 3.05pm: Film: Seruppu (64min); Director: Amudhan, R. P.
In an old slum Dharmananthapuram, in the heart of Turuchirappalli in Tamil Nadu, live the Catholic Arundhatiyars, a community that makes footwear, a traditionally Dalit occupation. But according to the Presidential Order 1950: Para 3, by the Union Government of India, "No person who professes a religion different from Hindu, shall be deemed to be a member of a Scheduled Caste."
So even as Dalits who have converted to Islam or Christianity, they continue to live under the historical oppressions of caste - they are denied access to reservations in jobs, education and other mechanisms of affirmative action designated for Scheduled Castes as per the Indian Constitution. With growing mechanisation in footwear manufacturing in an era of globalisation, Arundhatiyars lead a life of growing difficulty and invisibility.

3.05 to 3.40pm: Discussion: With Prof. P. Thirumal, University of Hyderabad

3.40 to 4.00pm Film: Meanwhile the Killing Continues (18min); Director: Maheen Mirza
The film looks into an alleged encounter of a 15 year old adivasi girl, Meena Khalkho who lived in Village Karcha of Balrampur district of North Chhattisharh. She was killed by the police who alleged that she was a naxalite. Moving between the electronic news coverage of the incident and testimonies of her parents and other people from her village, the film investigates the claims of the police. Sexual violence, the attempt to suppress the truth of meena’s murder and the impunity of the culprits gradually comes to light. We also get a glimpse into how difficult and long the struggle for justice is in the conflict zones of the country. This film is part of a series of films called Loktantra Hazir Ho produced by the Women Against Sexual Violence and State Repression (WSS).

4.00 to 4.20pm: Film: Encountering Injustice (14min); Director: Maheen Mirza

In a combing operation in the Dantewara region of Chattisgarh an adivasi was encountered and killed by security forces. He and his wife had gone to a stream to bathe and collect material to make a baadi and were catching crabs when the security forces opened fire. Budhri, the woman hid behind a tree but Bhima Nuppo was shot and killed. The people from rewali village of which Budhri and Bhima were residents called the local leaders and media to investigate this incident and bring out the unprecedented violence that adivasis living in the area have to face regularly. A rally of about 7000 people set out to seek justice for Budhri and her 5 children. They were stopped and not allowed to go to the Collector office. Negotiations ensued between the people and the administration. The film documents the entire process.

4.20 to 4.30pm Tea Break

4.30 to 5.15pm: Discussion: With Dr. Partha Sarathy, EFL-U, Hyderabad

5.15 to 6.20pm: Film: A Delicate Weave (62min); Directors: Anjali Monteiro and K P Jayasankar
A Delicate Weave, set in Kachchh, Gujarat, India, traces four different musical journeys, all converging in the ways they affirm religious diversity, syncretism and love of the other. Drawing on the poetic and musical traditions of Kabir and Shah Bhitai, as well as the folk traditions of the region, these remarkable musicians and singers bear testimony to how these oral traditions of compassion are being passed down from one generation to the next.

Whether it is the group of young men in Bhujodi who meet every night to sing the bhajans of Kabir, or the feisty women from Lakhpat, who quietly subvert gender roles through their music performances, or Noor Mohammad Sodha, who plays and teaches exquisite flute music, or Jiant Khan and his disciples, whose love for the Sufi poet Bhitai is expressed through the ethereal form of Waee singing—all these passionate musicians keep alive this delicate weave, committed to the project of what Naranbhai, a carpet weaver and community archivist from Bhujodi calls “breaking down the walls”; walls that have been built up through the politics of hate and intolerance that marks our times.

This is the latest in the Kachchh Trilogy— the earlier ones are A Two Day Fair , 2009 (Do Din Ka Mela) and Like Here Like There , 2011 (So Heddan So Hoddan)

6.20 to 7.40pm: Film: Up, Down and Sideways (83min)
Directors: Anushka Meenakshi and Iswar Srikumar

7.40 to 8.25pm: Discussion: (to be decided)

8.25pm: Dinner

Day 2: 11 Feb, 2018

10.00 to 10.50am: Film: I am Bonnie (45min); Directors: Farha Katun, Satarupa Santra & Saurabh Kanti Dutta
Bonnie (33) is again on the run. He has been on the run from his family and sports fraternity since failing 'sex test' before the Bangkok Asian Games, 1998.
A born intersex, raised by poor, illiterate and confused parents as a girl named 'Bandana', s/he became one of the finest strikers of Indian Woman's football team in her/his short career. A Sex Reassignment surgery later transformed her/him to a man but left him without home or career. He left home, took up idol-making for a living. He met Swati (F24) then; they fell in love and married soon but had to move once again fearing social backlash. His fight to establish his identity, struggle for existence is met by a sarcastic society which is yet to learn to take 'other genders' seriously.

10.50 to 12.00pm: Film: Mod (70min); Director: Pushpa Rawat
'Mod' is an attempt by the filmmaker at communicating with the young men who hang out at the ‘notorious’ water tank in her neighbourhood in Pratap Vihar, Ghaziabad. The water tank is a space that is frequented by the so-called ‘no-gooders’ of the locality, a place where they play cricket, play cards, drink and smoke up. When she enters the space with her camera, the boys are curious and at the same time wary of it and her. They sometimes resist, sometimes protest, and at times, open up. As the film unfolds we get a hint of the lives the boys lead and the fragile world they create for themselves at the water tank.

12.00 to 12.15pm: Tea Break

12.15to1.00pm: Discussion: With Prof. Nikhila H, EFL-U, Hyderabad and Ranjani K Murthy, freelance researcher / activist

1.00 to 2.00pm: Lunch Break

2.00pm to 3.20: Film: Bird Trapper or Beggar (79min); Director: Vinod Raja
The Hakki Pikkis are a free spirited nomadic tribe who began their wandering many generations ago in the North Western part of the Indian subcontinent. Over time they travelled through and settled in different states of the country. As they moved, they survived through trapping birds and hunting small game in the forests and selling them in cities and towns along with lucky charms and trinkets. If the trap failed, begging was the next best bet! Exiled from the forest, reviled by the city, their traditional ways of life outlawed the Hakki Pikkis share their stories of wit and survival in the film that emerged through a series of community conversations held when we travelled with friends from a settlement in Bannerghatta, Bangalore to other settlements across Karnataka.

3.20 to 4.25pm: Film: Nicobar, A long way (65min); Director: Richa Hushing
Deep in the Bay of Bengal, the Nicobar archipelago, a tribal reserve protected under Andaman and Nicobar Protection of Aboriginal Tribes Regulation, was worst hit by the Tsunami of 26th December 2004. Self-subsistent and relatively isolated, post Tsunami the aboriginal world was suddenly invaded

4.25 to 4.40pm: Tea Break

4.40 to 5.25pm: Discussion: With Prof. Nikhila H., EFLU, Hyderabad

5.25 to 6.20pm Film: Nuclear Hallucinations (54min); Director: N. Fatima
Nuclear hallucinations is a film, which claims to be a documentary, and it is centred the anti-nuclear struggle against the kudankulam atomic power project in south India.

6.20 to 7.00pm: Discussion: With Dr. S P Udayakumar, Writer, anti-nuclear activist and the convener of the People's Movement Against Nuclear Energy (PMANE).

7.00 to 7.30pm: Closing Remarks/ Reflection

7.30pm: Dinner

* Local transport would be available for those coming from the city
** Lunch and dinner will be provided to the participants
*** Accommodation not available 

For any queries, please contact:
Mr. Sunil Neelakandan- 9502234480/ Ms. G.Sushma- 9100453192

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Social Justice Film Festivals Across India!

Social Justice Film Festival Across India! 

Social Justice is a justice, the socially marginalized section of a society is denied or ought to be given.
Caste, gender, class, race, color, language, region, disability and sexual preference become factors in a country like India when we discuss social justice.

Dalits, tribals, religious and linguistic minorities, people from north east India and Kashmir, women in general, workers, small and marginalized farmers, physically challenged and sexual minorities in India are denied social justice in one way or other despite the fact they form a majority demographically.
'Social Justice Film Festivals' is a series of film festivals that is organised across the country in association with various educational institutions, film societies, voluntary organisations, trade unions, and cultural groups. 

We welcome you to join the movement! 

Amudhan R.P.
Curator
Social Justice Film Festivals

11th Social Justice Film Festival of India 2022

11th Social Justice Film Festival of India 2022 11th Social Justice Film Festival of India 2022 will be organised by MARUPAKKAM in associati...